Fiscal Costs and Public Safety Risks of Low-Density Residential Development on Farmland

This report presents findings from three diverse geographic areas of low−density residential development on agricultural land in Northeastern Illinois. By low−density housing built on farmland, we mean either one or a combination of two development patterns: (1) homes built on large lots − such as on one or more acres per dwelling unit − or (2) houses with smaller lots but located in developments that are scattered so that a half−mile or more of farmland separates one development from the other. With residential scatter it is likely that large distances separate the homes from schools, fire stations, rescue squads, grocery stores, pharmacies and other providers of essential services. In these three study sites, they looked for whether the distances generate fiscal costs and public safety risks that could be avoided or reduced in more compact development.

Fiscal Costs and Public Safety Risks of Low-Density Residential Development on Farmland

Sensible Development for Small Communities ppt

This is a PowerPoint presentation on development within small communities and the environmental impacts that can result. This gives problems and potential solutions to decrease any factors that could potentially have a negative effect on the water quality.

Sensible Development for Small Communities ppt

Isolated: Illinois Wetlands at Risk, Sierra Club

The Illinois Chapter of the Sierra Club set out to determine the impact of this decision upon Illinois’ wetlands; particularly wetlands in the northeastern part of Illinois; which according to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, has the highest number of isolated wetlands in the State. The Chicago District includes the six counties in northeastern Illinois: Lake, McHenry, Kane, DuPage, Cook and Will counties, corresponding to the footprint of greater metropolitan Chicago. It is also the region of the state, according to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, with the most isolated wetlands. Research shows that Wetlands are worth saving because of their benefits to both humans and wildlife.

Isolated: Illinois Wetlands at Risk, Sierra Club

Town of Normal Flood Code

This document contains flood hazard area development regulations for the Town of Normal. Information included is intended to: prevent unwise developments from increasing flood or drainage hazards to others; protect new buildings and major improvements to buildings from flood damage; promote and protect the public health, safety, and general welfare of the citizens from the hazards of flooding; to lessen the burden on the taxpayer for flood control, repairs to public facilities and utilities, and flood rescue and relief operations to maintain property values and a stable tax base by minimizing the potential for creating blight areas to make federally subsidized flood insurance available; and to preserve the natural characteristics and functions of watercourses and floodplains in order to moderate flood and stormwater impacts, improve water quality, reduce soil erosion, protect aquatic and riparian habitat, provide recreational opportunities, provide aesthetic benefits, and enhance community and economic development.

Town of Normal Flood Code

Clinton Lake Watershed Plan

Based upon the information gathered, the Clinton Lake Watershed Resource Planning Committee, Technical Advisory Committee, and project planning staff have identified sedimentation and contaminants as the primary sources of water quality degradation in the Clinton Lake Watershed. Sedimentation and contaminants are threatening the health and recreational value of the lake and its tributaries. The continuing influence of these sources is due to minimal public awareness regarding water quality issues and influences; nonpoint source runoff from agricultural and residential practices, including conventional tillage and application of nutrients; and exposed streambanks and lakeshore throughout the watershed. Incorporated into the objectives are action items that will increase awareness and build partnerships throughout the watershed.

Clinton Lake Watershed Plan

Before the Wells Run Dry: Ensuring Sustainable Water Supplies for Illinois

This report recommends coordinated planning and implementation strategies that will capitalize on the work of the pilot regional planning groups, integrate regional plans with state and local practices, and ensure the long-term sustainability and effi cient use of our finite, fragile water resources. A bottom-up approach supported by local management of water supplies is necessary to ensure state policies, programs and investments support the regional planning process, and coincide with local support of data-rich and stakeholder-driven regional water supply plans.

Before the Wells Run Dry: Ensuring Sustainable Water Supplies for Illinois

Interim Bloomington Water Supply Plan

The water supply challenges of the City of Bloomington, Illinois (City) are typical of many communities.The Water Department must address both short-term issues related to surface-water quality deterioration and interim-term needs for additional sources of supply. The City is working to alleviate two areas of concern: high nitrate levels in Lake Bloomington, and finding new sources of water to support population growth in the City. The primary objective of this project is to design an interim water supply plan that takes into consideration available supplies, water quality, management, and infrastructure options.

Interim Bloomington Water Supply Plan